What to Expect

What to expect with your new pet

Because we understand that every case is different and we want to take a customized approach to your pet's care, we cannot define what to expect in every situation, however in general we ask that you arrive to your appointment 5-10 minutes early to go over paperwork and check in. Other commonalities to various visit types are summarized below; this list is not all-inclusive, so please bring a list of questions or concerns with you to your appointment, and be sure your pet is accompanied by someone familiar with his or her daily routine!

Puppies & Kittens

Please bring any records from the breeder, shelter, or previous owner. Bring a stool sample (about a grape-sized amount or more in a clean, sealed plastic baggie) to submit for parasite testing. Be aware of what type of food you feed.

Annual Examinations & Routine Care

Bring a stool sample (about a grape-sized amount or more in a clean, sealed plastic baggie) for annual parasite testing -- parasites are common and easily picked up from yards, on walks, at parks, etc., and many are zoonotic - meaning they can be passed to you or your family. Bring a list of any possible concerns such as increased thirst, appetite, changes in behavior, or accidents in the house.

Sick or Injured Pets

Do a quick walk-around the home and property to ensure nothing has been chewed or disrupted, including garbage, plants, garage cleaners/chemicals, torn up bedding or toys, etc. Bring any chewed up items or packaging with you to the appointment. If your pet is injured, be very careful to avoid getting bit -- your pet is most likely very afraid and may be in pain and not aware of what he or she is doing - use a fluffy towel or blanket to pick your pet up if need be.

Urgent or Emergency Care

It is always best to come right in if you are worried about your pet's immediate well-being. Gathering as many details as possible is very helpful, but often causes too great of a delay in getting care. Stay calm and call ahead if you are able.

Dental Procedures

Your pet must be fasted overnight prior to the anesthetic procedure, unless otherwise directed by the doctor in cases such as patients with diabetes. Please plan to be reachable by phone between 9 am - 2pm so that we may discuss the findings of the full oral examination and make recommendations for extractions, if necessary. We must have your consent to continue with such procedures (either written on the drop off form or verbal during the procedure) and cannot keep a patient under anesthesia after the cleaning is completed to wait for a return call.

Surgery & Procedures

Your pet must be fasted overnight prior to the anesthetic procedure, unless otherwise directed by the doctor in cases such as patients with diabetes. For procedures such as radiographs (x-rays), skin wounds, broken toe-nails, or fox tails in the ears or nose, sedation may be necessary. Please do not feed your pet prior to your appointment and be prepared to leave him or her for several hours to wake up from the sedation enough to go home.

Other

Please call about any special considerations for specialty diagnostics such as ultrasounds or blood tests other than routine screenings. Your pet's veterinarian will provide you with information such as timing of medications, feeding, etc. in these situations.

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